Nigerian develops device to detect illness & explosives

Oshi Agabi who is based in the Silicon Valley area of California has successfully developed a computer device based on mice neurons as against the popular silicon which is able to smell cancer cells and explosives.

A Nigerian man has successfully built a computer device that can detect illness and explosives by recognizing their smell.

Unveiled at the TEDGlobal conference in Tanzania, the device is designed to recognize the smell of explosives, acting as a bomb detector. 

It is a small device the size of a computer internet modem and named the Koniku Kore. It is a product of Agabi's startup, Koniku which was launched over a year ago and has so far garnered about One million dollars in funding.

Agabi also noted that he made made about $10 million profit from deals and contracts within the security industry.

“You can give the neurons instructions about what to do – in our case we tell it to provide a receptor that can detect explosives.”

“As well as being used for bomb detection, the device could be used to detect illness by sensing markers of a disease in the air molecules that a patient gives off.”

According to The Herald, Agabi grew up in Lagos. He was quoted as saying “Lagos is a place that demands grit. Growing up there gave me an unconventional way of always looking at problems.

Oshi Agabi who is based in the Silicon Valley area of California has successfully developed a computer device based on mice neurons as against the popular silicon which is able to smell cancer cells and explosives.

A Nigerian man has successfully built a computer device that can detect illness and explosives by recognizing their smell.

Unveiled at the TEDGlobal conference in Tanzania, the device is designed to recognize the smell of explosives, acting as a bomb detector. 

It is a small device the size of a computer internet modem and named the Koniku Kore. It is a product of Agabi's startup, Koniku which was launched over a year ago and has so far garnered about One million dollars in funding.

Agabi also noted that he made made about $10 million profit from deals and contracts within the security industry.

“You can give the neurons instructions about what to do – in our case we tell it to provide a receptor that can detect explosives.”

“As well as being used for bomb detection, the device could be used to detect illness by sensing markers of a disease in the air molecules that a patient gives off.”

According to The Herald, Agabi grew up in Lagos. He was quoted as saying “Lagos is a place that demands grit. Growing up there gave me an unconventional way of always looking at problems.