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Australia to begin testing driverless buses

Australia's busy city of Sydney is set to host a test drive of a driverless shuttle around the Sydney Olympic Park in a few weeks from now. The 15-seater autonomous bus is scheduled to drive along a programmed route using computer algorithms alongside several sensors to estimate its direction and line of sight.

Australia to begin testing driverless buses

I've always envisioned that someday, maybe not anytime soon, cars and trucks and passenger buses would go all-electric and autonomous without needing human intervention as regards operations. The Tesla Model S is an example today.

“It follows a track that is pre-programmed. It has an accuracy of 20 millimetres at the moment, which is pretty extraordinary. We’re using an external GPS system which also coordinates the shuttle and helps the shuttle remain accurate", said an official at the company responsible for the proposed test drive.

I made a post about this self-driving shuttle which was built by French automobile company, Navya. Although Australia won't be the first to carry out the test as France already did few months back. 

“This vehicle has a number of cameras at the front and rear and advanced sensors like laser radar that the vehicle uses to understand its surrounding, detect and anticipate any risks of a collision and then use technology like autonomous emergency braking to avoid collisions. The vehicle is also equipped with two emergency stop buttons", the company said.

Sydney's Roads Minister Melinda Pavey notes that the trial is the first step in introducing automated vehicles to the city’s infrastructure.

“We want to use the trial to help develop the systems that will enable automated vehicles to be connected to our infrastructure, like traffic lights and to our customers through their devices and applications. It’s the combination of connectivity and automation that will provide the safety and mobility benefits we are looking for."

“There is still some way to go before automated shuttles become common place on Australian roads, but as a Government we are ready to take the next step and from here all sorts of possibilities open up for transport in NSW.”

Australia's busy city of Sydney is set to host a test drive of a driverless shuttle around the Sydney Olympic Park in a few weeks from now. The 15-seater autonomous bus is scheduled to drive along a programmed route using computer algorithms alongside several sensors to estimate its direction and line of sight.

Australia to begin testing driverless buses

I've always envisioned that someday, maybe not anytime soon, cars and trucks and passenger buses would go all-electric and autonomous without needing human intervention as regards operations. The Tesla Model S is an example today.

“It follows a track that is pre-programmed. It has an accuracy of 20 millimetres at the moment, which is pretty extraordinary. We’re using an external GPS system which also coordinates the shuttle and helps the shuttle remain accurate", said an official at the company responsible for the proposed test drive.

I made a post about this self-driving shuttle which was built by French automobile company, Navya. Although Australia won't be the first to carry out the test as France already did few months back. 

“This vehicle has a number of cameras at the front and rear and advanced sensors like laser radar that the vehicle uses to understand its surrounding, detect and anticipate any risks of a collision and then use technology like autonomous emergency braking to avoid collisions. The vehicle is also equipped with two emergency stop buttons", the company said.

Sydney's Roads Minister Melinda Pavey notes that the trial is the first step in introducing automated vehicles to the city’s infrastructure.

“We want to use the trial to help develop the systems that will enable automated vehicles to be connected to our infrastructure, like traffic lights and to our customers through their devices and applications. It’s the combination of connectivity and automation that will provide the safety and mobility benefits we are looking for."

“There is still some way to go before automated shuttles become common place on Australian roads, but as a Government we are ready to take the next step and from here all sorts of possibilities open up for transport in NSW.”