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Eugene Cernan: Last Man To Walk On The Moon Dies At Age 82

Very saddening and a great loss, yet we celebrate the advancement of the frontiers of human civilization, technology and science - thanks to the contribution of the early key role players like Astronaut Gene Cernan.

The last man to walk on the moon
Gene Cernan was the last astronaut to walk on the moon and worked with National Aeronautic Space Administration (NASA) for years.
Certainly, it's a great feat and an eternal memory and excitement to have walked on the moon, as 99% of the world's population never get the opportunity to.

Several Apollo missions have been embarked upon by NASA, although some tragic missions have been recorded.

Gene Cernan was the command officer during the 1972 Apollo 17 Mission by NASA, precisely December 7th. Just after four days, the crew landed on the moon, signaling a successful first phase mission. That was his third and last journey to space. As well, that was the last mission to the moon by NASA.

In his words upon arrival:

“We’d like to dedicate the first steps of Apollo 17 to all those who made it possible,” the astronaut radioed upon exiting the lander. “Oh my golly! Unbelievable!”

Just before disembarking from the lunar surface, he quoted:

“As I take these last steps from the surface for some time into the future to come, I’d just like to record that America’s challenge of today has forged man’s destiny of tomorrow.”

According to NASA, Cernan died on the 16th January, 2017 in Texas, at the age of 82, after  succumbing to ongoing health issues.

“Gene’s footprints remain on the moon, and his achievements are imprinted in our hearts and memories,” said NASA staff.

In a parting famous quote of his:

We truly are in an age of challenge. With that challenge comes opportunity. The sky is no longer the limit. The word impossible no longer belongs in our vocabulary. We have proved that we can do whatever we have the resolve to do. The limit to our reach is our own complacency.

Rest well Gene, your world awaits beyond.

More updates soon...
Very saddening and a great loss, yet we celebrate the advancement of the frontiers of human civilization, technology and science - thanks to the contribution of the early key role players like Astronaut Gene Cernan.

The last man to walk on the moon
Gene Cernan was the last astronaut to walk on the moon and worked with National Aeronautic Space Administration (NASA) for years.
Certainly, it's a great feat and an eternal memory and excitement to have walked on the moon, as 99% of the world's population never get the opportunity to.

Several Apollo missions have been embarked upon by NASA, although some tragic missions have been recorded.

Gene Cernan was the command officer during the 1972 Apollo 17 Mission by NASA, precisely December 7th. Just after four days, the crew landed on the moon, signaling a successful first phase mission. That was his third and last journey to space. As well, that was the last mission to the moon by NASA.

In his words upon arrival:

“We’d like to dedicate the first steps of Apollo 17 to all those who made it possible,” the astronaut radioed upon exiting the lander. “Oh my golly! Unbelievable!”

Just before disembarking from the lunar surface, he quoted:

“As I take these last steps from the surface for some time into the future to come, I’d just like to record that America’s challenge of today has forged man’s destiny of tomorrow.”

According to NASA, Cernan died on the 16th January, 2017 in Texas, at the age of 82, after  succumbing to ongoing health issues.

“Gene’s footprints remain on the moon, and his achievements are imprinted in our hearts and memories,” said NASA staff.

In a parting famous quote of his:

We truly are in an age of challenge. With that challenge comes opportunity. The sky is no longer the limit. The word impossible no longer belongs in our vocabulary. We have proved that we can do whatever we have the resolve to do. The limit to our reach is our own complacency.

Rest well Gene, your world awaits beyond.

More updates soon...